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shipping container living

topic posted Sun, March 5, 2006 - 5:25 AM by  Unsubscribed
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thats what i'm about at present. beaverlake.homestead.com/moark.html i chose a refrigerated unit instead of a SEA BOX container because the reefer was ready to bury. the reefer gave me the max for $$.
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    Re: shipping container living

    Tue, September 5, 2006 - 10:15 PM
    there was a segment on CNN last nite about how they are building homes from seabox's in Los angelas. theres so many that they are legislating against storage areas in residential areas because they are stacking them up so high they are casting shadows on homes. they said that 7000 come into the country daily but only 2000 leave. if thats the case how come they ain't giving them away?
    • Re: shipping container living

      Sat, November 22, 2008 - 5:11 AM
      Tue, September 5, 2006 - 10:15 PM
      Re: shipping container living
      there was a segment on CNN last nite about how they are building homes from seabox's in Los angelas. theres so many that they are legislating against storage areas in residential areas because they are stacking them up so high they are casting shadows on homes. they said that 7000 come into the country daily but only 2000 leave. if thats the case how come they ain't giving them away?


      How big are these containers nad who makes houses out of them?
      • Re: shipping container living

        Sun, November 23, 2008 - 9:35 AM
        <<<How big are these containers nad who makes houses out of them?>>>

        Click on the links elsewhere in this thread, for detailed info about size, features, who's converting them where & for what, etc. You might also like this tribe, which also has Shipping Container threads.
        tribes.tribe.net/nontradit...ngbuilding


        Basically, there are 3 container sizes--- 20ft x 8 ft with an 8 ft ceiling, 40x8x8, and what's called a "high cube" which is 40x8 with a 9'6 ceiling.
        • Shipping Container Living

          Sun, January 18, 2009 - 1:11 AM
          I'm sure we have duplicate links re this topic (there are so many sites for them, yay!).
          But some sites are so good that I figure, post 'em anyway, even if it's a repeat.

          This link has some interesting comments from people who say "tried to live in one, it didn't work and here's why".....followed by comments from people who say "ours worked great, here's how & why". Looks like a ton of links on this page.
          :)

          nielsenhayden.com/makinglig...09454.html

          And of course, this one, which will also keep you busy for hours"
          firmitas.org/

          Another short article with links and a page of interesting comments on Shipping Container Living
          www.dvorak.org/blog/2006/...to-housing/
        • Re: shipping container living

          Fri, January 23, 2009 - 11:39 PM

          This Missouri project is an architect-and-designer-built 4-container home ($150, 000) so I'm not pasting the entire article here---- definitely not "cheap shelter"!

          But as is always the case with these professionally-built homes, you can still learn a lot from pics and info on how it was done. Actually, I'm remembering that her $150, 000 included septic tank, a code-approved foundation, radiant heating in the floors, site work/grading, driveway, etc---- in addition to paying the architects and builders. I'm guessing an owner-built, no-frills, skip-the-code compliance, built-on-level-ground, etc version could be built for $15,000 or under.


          www.news-leader.com/article/...901120362
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    Jan
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    Re: shipping container living

    Tue, September 19, 2006 - 3:00 AM
    We are in process of gathering info about shipping container living and I stumbled onto your listings. Would love to see any and all pics you have.

    Will post more later as time allows. THanks for being here.
    • Re: shipping container living

      Mon, September 25, 2006 - 3:45 PM
      What about putting them under ground? Will they hold up?
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        Re: shipping container living

        Sat, September 30, 2006 - 10:51 AM
        think BERM not underground. set them on RR crossties and cover with earth. all the benefits of burying without the problems. i'm gonna incorporate earth thermal in mine. bury a grid like a septic field but of solid PVC instead of holed. use a rotron fan to constantly move interior air through it. will not only cool but dry the air. moisture will be collected from the low end into burried tank for water also. AIRWELL to boot. heres details. beaverlake.homestead.com/moark.html
        • Re: shipping container living

          Sun, October 1, 2006 - 10:07 AM
          This is one area that I'm not as familier with as a I should be. What are the differences between underground and building up a berm around them?
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            Re: shipping container living

            Sun, October 1, 2006 - 2:12 PM
            underground is subsurface and entails many structural loads such as side pressures and roof loads as well as drainage and ventilation considerations that are not associated with berming which is above surface but covered lightly with earth.
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    Re: shipping container living

    Sun, July 1, 2007 - 1:04 PM
    heres a neat slide show
    www.hybridseattle.com/
    • Re: shipping container living

      Wed, July 25, 2007 - 8:31 PM
      I'm getting closer to purchasing a shipping container and am really wondering about the cost .
      In the last week or so I ran across some forum where a person commented about just HOW cheap they've gotten, saying "they're everywhere for $200-$500 here in East Texas" (referring to 20-footers I think??).
      I'm still not seeing the 40 ft versions any cheaper than $1,700 to $2,300 or so (plus freight) on the east coast, so I'm wondering what's up with that. I'm 4 hours or so from a couple of east coast ports; they SHOULD be cheap, here, relatively speaking. Anyone have any current info? What about approximate cost per mile for delivery to your destination?

      Also, anyone have any info about crane costs, if you need to rent a crane + operator to move them a short distance, vs. being able to just have the container slid off the truck into place?

      I've crossposted this in my Non-Traditional Building & Housing tribe as well
      tribes.tribe.net/nontradit...ngbuilding
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        Re: shipping container living

        Thu, July 26, 2007 - 11:40 AM
        i'll bet condition makes a difference on the price. 40 footers are still $1500-2000 here DELIVERED within 150 or so miles. what kind of application are you ponderring that might need a crane?
        • Re: shipping container living

          Fri, July 27, 2007 - 1:43 AM
          <<<what kind of application are you ponderring that might need a crane?>>>

          Two different applications.

          1) I'm planning to use a 20-footer as an extension onto another structure.....I'll skip the whole story but suffice it to say, the "other structure" isn't ready yet, and won't be for awhile. I can either wait till that's done before I purchase and install the 20-foot container (too long to wait!! I want to get started!!!) or I can buy the 20-footer now, set it temporarily, and be getting some use out of it.
          Meaning, I'll have to move it later. Not far. It might have to picked up and moved 40-50 feet away, then into its proper and permanent spot.

          2) I also plan to buy a 40-footer, later. There may not be space for a truck to back into the perfect spot and unload that. More likely, it will need to be picked up by a crane, and set on its foundation.

          Since you responded here, Steve, I might as well ask while I'm thinking about it----
          I seem to recall that you set your container on railroad ties.
          Did you use gravel under it as well? Any problems with the railroad tie base? Any regrets now, re how you set it, i.e would you do anything any different, use different a different foundation if you had it to do all over?

          I recall yours being bermed. Both my 20 and 40 will be on level ground, perhaps on railroad ties. I like the idea of gravel around/under them so no water ever pools, there's no mud, etc. As heavy as these things are, I see no need to pour any kind of concrete base, or even use sonotubes.
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            Re: shipping container living

            Fri, July 27, 2007 - 3:14 AM
            no regrets. crossties are kinda the standard way to set them down. you only need two. one forward and one aft. thats if you are on semi-level ground.
            • Re: shipping container living

              Fri, July 27, 2007 - 7:46 PM
              These would be really cool if you were to link a bunch of them together, each as a seperate room, and bury them under about 2' of earth. The entrance would be tricky as you would need something that didn;t turn into a mud pit by allowing rain to collect at the front door.

              You say those things are about $2K? Are these the same things I see on trains all the time?
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    Re: shipping container living

    Sat, December 22, 2007 - 8:14 PM
    F****** awesome!

    thanks for posting this. I love the concept of using steel containers...its "green", involves recycling, reusing, and reducing waste.

    Two questions for you though...Do you know by chance how much that "thermaflex" spray stuff costs roughly and have you considered a way to test containers for leftover hazmat before converting to a home?

    I work as a reservist in the USCG and my job is to respond to oil spills and hazmat in the ocean. We've often been called to containers leaking out hazmat in the past.

    Just a thought.

    Thanks for posting this.
    • Re: shipping container living

      Tue, December 25, 2007 - 2:02 AM
      <<my job is to respond to oil spills and hazmat in the ocean. We've often been called to containers leaking out hazmat in the past.>>

      I've often wondered the same thing, re how you'd know for sure what materials were transported or stored in your container, before you bought it. I would not trust the information supplied by the seller--- usually they just advertise one for sale and even if there's a photo, it isn't a photo of "your" container, it's just their generic, stock photo, to show dimenions, features, etc. Or if you contact a dealer, they just pick out a container that matches your order (40 ft vs 20 vs high cube), and put it on a truck, or have it waiting for you in a loading area, if you're handling your own transport. I've heard of people buying containers that were used to ship chiles, and not being able to use the container because of the irritating odor/residue. Has anyone dealt with this issue?
      • Re: shipping container living

        Mon, May 26, 2008 - 4:41 PM
        Three posts moved here. We already have at least 3 threads on Shipping Containers; didn't need another duplicate thread:
        ...............................................

        Re: shipping Container living Sun, May 11, 2008 - 8:52 PM
        Every state has different homesteading laws. Homesteading your property is done at the county level and can lower your property taxes. Just because you buy and are paying for the property doesn't necessarily mean you OWN it; just that you have the right to pay taxes on it.

        MP & BB
        John
        ))0((


        Re: shipping Container living Sun, May 11, 2008 - 5:24 PM
        in response to: Re: shipping Container living
        I am more than a bit confused by that question....

        If you own the property, I don't think there is any need for homesteadding, right? Or are you asking if you can sell your boxcar off to some hillbilly as his own residence? Or is this a question about building codes and using a storage unit as a primary residence?

        Need a little more explanation to work with here.



        Re: shipping Container living Sun, May 11, 2008 - 5:12 PM
        If you own the property and have a container to live in can that be homesteaded?
        • Re: shipping container living

          Mon, May 26, 2008 - 7:37 PM
          several years ago I lost a bit on a chunk of land and was told that there was nothing I could recoup . But it was discovered that I had sold the trailer ( Primary home )to one person and the land to another so I was able to claim the loss on the property on taxes as it was not my home . The laws can get complicated and every place is different .
      • Re: shipping container living

        Tue, November 18, 2008 - 4:52 AM
        "I've often wondered the same thing, re how you'd know for sure what materials were transported or stored in your container, before you bought it."

        i doubt you could ever know exactly what nasty stuff had been in it thru its life. i would treat any used container as potentially deadly from jump. rubber suit mask boots

        pressure wash inside of the beast then steam clean it. then rent big floor sander and strip the oak floor until its smooth
        that is what im gonna do

        i went into a new singlewide econobox manufactured home yesterday and the fumes from fermaldihyde (sp?) made my eyes water so badly i had to bail. they dealer was asking 28k for that pos. so im not so worried about a container after cleaning now.
        • Re: shipping container living

          Tue, November 18, 2008 - 8:39 PM
          <<<i doubt you could ever know exactly what nasty stuff had been in it thru its life. i would treat any used container as potentially deadly from jump. rubber suit mask boots>>>

          Fortunately, I've found a place where I can view & select my _exact_ container in person, vs. "orderiing" it and taking what I get. I feel much better about buying containers, now that I have this option. I've walked thru a few of them, and I tell ya----- I have a much harder time walking down any supermarket detergent aisle, or any department store's "Christmas aisles" with all the fake bayberry and pine etc scents. My eyes water and burn in those store aisles, whereas I didn't have any problem standing around in the 40 ft container for ten minutes (not that all toxins show themselves so quickly or obviously). I recommend that anyone planning to buy a container try to find a way to inspect it in person first. Like you, I've had the experience of walking into a brand new "traditional" dwelling----- filled with carpet glue, paneling glue, off-gassing carpets and other materials, formaldehyde, etc----- and experienced a headache and watering eyes within minutes. I feel just as safe, if not safer, with a container.
  • Re: shipping container living

    Sat, September 27, 2008 - 10:12 PM
    Great blog on step by step conversion of a shipping container.

    dwellbox.com/dwellblog/

    This is what I've been looking for, specifically to learn more about the interior framing, dealing with doors and walls, etc.
    • Re: shipping container living

      Tue, November 18, 2008 - 4:44 AM
      i sent dwellbox a message yesterday when i met the tribe for the first time and found that link you had posted. so far no response.

      i really think containers coupled with a pole barn type southern facing glassed front (maybe even use sips if the funds can be found) would yield a fine home. if the tainers were prepped and bermed i bet the whole structure would be very efficient. back in the van conversion days we put rubber backed carpet on the steel walls and it did not sweat any longer. sprayon insulation is nice but expensive to me. i think (imho) with berming and proper venting one could forego the spray insulation

      dig a big fish pond and use that soil (onsite soil is for sure cheapest and ental backhoes are much cheaper than rental cranes) to berm with on 3 sides and move in. one good thing about being very sight challenged is that things dont have to be really pretty just user friendly and i think containers with an open floor plan would be great for me. . just build down the sides of the metal caves and let the larger common area heat the whole

      plus as a bonus if we berm/earth shelter we get a lot of tornado/ heavy storm protection possibly even from fire if done right too.

      bright blessings and respects, johnny
      • Re: shipping container living

        Tue, November 18, 2008 - 8:26 PM
        <<<if the tainers were prepped and bermed>>>

        Johnny, if you're interested in berming, cruise thru old threads here (sorry, can't recall which ones without taking a few minutes to look, myself). The guy who started this tribe was very interested in berming, had a bermed container, and used to post a lot of info.
        • Re: shipping container living

          Thu, November 20, 2008 - 4:57 AM

          "Johnny, if you're interested in berming, cruise thru old threads here"

          thanks brother i will do that for sure. i really think berming is a good way to go and want to learn the downsides of it , if there are any besides the digging

          i now think of electroyisis and maybe the need for anode rod. the article i default towards is by Mike Olyer, he is the guy that wrote the "50 dollar undergound house" he calls it "PSP" post shorn poly and uses polyetylene film.

          i know some folks despise plastic , but in this case its long soil life is a plus

          soil is such a good insulator and sound deadener that i cant imagine being able to come up with enough money to use any other insulating method that would work as well. maybe im wrong though?

          even my little homebrew tornado shelter that used truck tires ala earthship fashion with the packed soil is warmer in winter and cooler in summer. this being without its doorways being finished (lack of funds for the bolts) i dunno wetaher to call it buried or bermed as its really both but you can surely tell temp differance.



          btw im really feeling this blessing. that being myself finding the tribe and like minded brothers and sisters to discuss all this with. knowledge is power. group mind is awesome!

          brightest blessings all, johnny

          ps: today im hopeful fl. blind services brings me a screen reader proggie that will function with this elder ubuntu. then i can really enjoy tribe.net ;)
  • Re: Shipping Container Living

    Sun, February 15, 2009 - 5:50 PM
    So what people tend to use as "foundations" for shipping containers are:

    -Concrete Slab--- Overkill? Not necessary. Expensive. Seems to go with the high dollar "designer pre-fab" conversion route.

    -Railroad Ties--- Usually just 2 ties. Cheap. Easy.

    -Poured Concrete Piers-- "Attractive", slick looking. Gives you option of setting shipping container to any height you want.
    Some examples are "Quik-Tubes"
    home.comcast.net/~tegwilym..._start.jpg

    Here's a new product designed to replace the cardboard tubes. "Ceme-tube"
    www.cemetube.com/standard.shtml

    A high dollar commercial version
    www.amazon.com/Fab-Form-F.../B001JDEZ0I

    Tried and true "sonotubes"
    www.sonotube.com/products/sonovoid.html

    I've also heard of people making their own tubes from pvc pipe sliced open then hinged or strapped together, so the tube can be reused (probably the route I'd go, if I was going to use concrete piers). I thnk you spray the inside of the pvc tube with a silicone or wax (generic furniture polish should work), as a mold releasing agent.

    So, for anyone who has a shipping container or who's gotten a close look at some converted shipping container dwellings in the flesh, what are they sitting on?
    Your thoughts on the best foundation options?

    With all the money I know I'll need to spend on other items in this project, I'm shifting from being set on sonotubes or making my own pvc form tubes--- for concrete piers----- to just sitting the damn things on two railroad ties. I honestly don't think they're going to "go anywhere" if I use railroad ties.
    • Unsu...
       

      Re: Shipping Container Living

      Sun, February 15, 2009 - 6:07 PM
      there's one just sitting on plain dirt on some vacant land up the street from me. it's been there for years, just set on the ground, no problems at all. I guess that's one of the nice things about a generally dry climate. I'm sure the area underneath is home to about ten million field mice by now.
      • Re: Shipping Container Living

        Sun, February 15, 2009 - 8:38 PM
        Sun, February 15, 2009 - 6:07 PM
        Re: Shipping Container Living
        there's one just sitting on plain dirt on some vacant land up the street from me. it's been there for years, just set on the ground, no problems at all. I guess that's one of the nice things about a generally dry climate. I'm sure the area underneath is home to about ten million field mice by now.


        How big is it?
      • Re: Shipping Container Living

        Sun, February 15, 2009 - 9:56 PM
        <<<there's one just sitting on plain dirt on some vacant land up the street from me>>>

        Yeah, people tend to do that when they buy or rent them for storage...especially the rentals folks expect to be there temporarily.
        Putting them directly on the ground is not a good idea long term or for a dwelling. They do rust... .
        In a desert climate it'd be fine. But in any other climate--- nope, bad idea.
        I'll definitely be putting mine up on something....just not sure what that something is yet.
        I'm sort of looking for all the reasons I _shouldn't_ just go with two railroad ties....to make sure I've looked at all the issues and options. At first I was going to go with concrete piers (pouring them myself...not hard) because I thought I'd raise the shipping container a foot or more off the ground, and the piers would look more "finished" (less like a storage container) and more appropriate for a dwelling. But I'm "adding on" to the shipping container (actually building in the space between two shipping containers) and I realized that I didn't want a big "step up" difference in the two levels of flooring. So that puts the shipping container back down closer to the ground again. Soooo....why bother with the "attractive" round, uniform concrete piers, which will then be nearly hidden underneath the container. Brings me back to the railroad tie idea. Cheap ($5-$15 each ), durable, stable, sturdy, relatively easy to haul, don't require assembly or finishing....just put them on the ground and have the person who delivers the shipping container offload it in place. The book I have on shipping container housing recommends insulating *underneath* the container, as in under the outside floor...but no one really does that. I'd like to glue some plastic sheeting or craft paper under there (vapor barrier) with Liquid Nails or similar construction glue, then squirt a few cans of foam insulation under there---- probably fast and half-assed, because it does NOT have to be "perfect"...it's added insulation that, as I said, few people bother to do. Only obstacle there is when and how to do it, because once the truck comes, they will want to drop this container off , get it in place, and go home. They're not going to stand around for an hour or two while I fool with glue and paper and cans of foam.... .
        Railroad ties will still put the container too close to the ground for me to crawl under and install insulation.
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          Re: Shipping Container Living

          Mon, February 16, 2009 - 8:50 AM
          another thing to consider is the slope of your ground. I would imagine you're going to need to use a string-level between the railroad ties to make sure they're level relative to each other. You may have to dig one down a couple inches.

          If the slope of your ground is bigger than the height of a railroad tie, you really oughta forget the ties and go with concrete pillars.

          if you don't have a string-level, you can just as easily use a lenght of hose filled with water. secure one end to one of your supports, and fill the water to the level of the support top. Then adjust the other support until it is level with the water inside the other end of the hose.
          • Unsu...
             

            Re: Shipping Container Living

            Mon, February 16, 2009 - 8:53 AM
            for insulation under the container i'd just make a 'skirt' of straw bales. They're about a dollar apiece and really high R value, last many many years and easy to replace.
          • Re: Shipping Container Living

            Mon, February 16, 2009 - 8:49 PM
            <<<<for insulation under the container i'd just make a 'skirt' of straw bales. They're about a dollar apiece and really high R value, last many many years and easy to replace. >>>

            <<<If the slope of your ground is bigger than the height of a railroad tie, you really oughta forget the ties and go with concrete pillars>>>

            I love straw bales and once used them, stacked, as insulation around a dog house. But for this application, I don't want the "barn look". I'm going for a modern/industrial look. I don't want to invite critters to next under and around my home either--- I'd have thousands of mice nesting in the straw. Price-wise, straw bales are also more like $3.00- $3.50 where I live. They were $2.50 each here when I bought them in 1996.
            The slope of the ground point is a good reminder. I don't have much of a slope there (am working on site preparation now) and will have the area graded down to level. The concrete piers are a good option for a sloped site.
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          Re: Shipping Container Living

          Mon, February 16, 2009 - 9:47 AM
          you don't really need to struggle like that.. put the crossties down then put black plastic , like is used to vapor barrier slabs, on top and set container.
          REEFERS are ALL ALUMINUM so don't suffer these problems.
          • Re: Shipping Container Living

            Mon, February 16, 2009 - 8:40 PM
            <<<<REEFERS are ALL ALUMINUM so don't suffer these problems.>>>

            Reefers (refrigerated shipping containers) are also far more expensive than the regular containers (some sources say 3x more expensive...if not moreso). They also have less interior space, due to the additional insulation. I don't care for that interior, and definitely don't want a reefer. I won't be paying more than $2000 + transport for my 40 ft container. The regular ones are steel. I prefer that for my use....they just need to be protected against rust.
            • Unsu...
               

              Re: Shipping Container Living

              Tue, February 17, 2009 - 3:47 PM
              I got mine ( 45 ft. long ) for $1450 delivered 100 miles. perfect condition. they are 102 inches high inside. thats MORE than a foot taller than a seabox. makers a HUGH difference inside. they are both the same width inside. the insulation is between the uprights just like you will have to do to insulate a seabox. the insulation doesn't take up any more room in the width of the useable floor space. you're gonna have a LOT more $$$$ in making a seabox as comfortable and finished than a stock reefer and will have to deal with the other issues like rust etc.
              i don't really care what you use. i am only advocating the reefer so that others can distinguish the differences.
              I've been through all this already.
              for those who might want to consider these advantages you can find obsolete reefers about as easy as seaboxes ( especially NOW ) just look for then differently.ask some local truckers or thier dispatchers where the surplus trailers go to. every major shipping center will have a yard full. usually in the hundreds.
  • Re: shipping container living

    Mon, August 10, 2009 - 7:49 PM


    Page includes two photos, and brief article on the Cordell House in Houston Texas, made from three shipping containers. Not a "cheap" house, but good starting point for info & inspiration.

    offcite.org/2009/03/23/s...for-the-times
    • Re: shipping container living

      Sun, November 8, 2009 - 11:44 PM

      More shipping container dwelling links.
      Updated--- the Containers 2 Clinics project is new info.

      www.inhabitat.com/tag/shipp...hitecture/
      • Re: shipping container living

        Mon, November 9, 2009 - 12:28 AM


        Mmm. Some beautiful shipping container work going on here.
        :)


        container-life.com/
        • Re: shipping container living

          Tue, November 10, 2009 - 1:27 AM

          I really like this unpretentious CHEAP little house, shown here in a YouTube video aptly titled "My Simple Shipping Container Home". One shipping container, with a simple screened-in porch added on.

          www.youtube.com/watch
          • Unsu...
             

            Re: shipping container living

            Tue, November 10, 2009 - 8:39 AM
            • Re: shipping container living

              Mon, November 16, 2009 - 4:32 PM

              Good pics on that site you posted below, Unknown (Nov 10). :)

              Just a few years ago, it was a lot harder to find info on shipping containers; now the info and photos are everywhere!
              :)

              Here's a quick video look at a lot of different containers, various garage door placements, doors, windows, etc.

              www.youtube.com/watch


              And here's a YouTube video on the topic of the "overpopulation" of stacked-up shipping containers.
              The video is from California. Maybe the glut of containers has brought the price of the containers way down in CA, but it sure hasn't happened on the east coast. They haven't significantly dropped in price on the east coast in the last 3-4 years. Of course, you often see advertisements for super-cheap containers ($1300-$1600), but that's the price where they sit, at the port. Once you add in the transport cost inland, they're not quite so cheap. It's not unusual for east coast shippers to quote $4.00-$5.00 per mile delivery charges + additional off-loading charges. Overall, the 40-footers still seem to go for about $2000-$2500 on the east coast. That varies according to condition and location.

              www.youtube.com/watch
              • Re: shipping container living

                Sun, January 10, 2010 - 10:16 PM


                "The Clean Hub"-- from an article by Jenna Wortham, in Wired magazine.

                I posted a pic in the Photos section.


                www.wired.com/culture/lif...tant_housing

                "...Clean Hub, a self-sustained, portable machine built into a recycled shipping container. It rolls a power station and water-purification plant into one unit, making it ideal for deployment to any disaster-stricken area lacking basic facilities. Intended more as a base from which to distribute necessities rather than a residential unit, the Clean Hub can provide enough energy, water and sanitation for up to 150 people.

                The Hub can be fabricated and shipped anywhere in the world in a few days -- and once at its destination, takes less than an hour to erect. Design perks: a V-shaped roof collects rainwater, 16 solar panels generate electricity, and an underground reverse-osmosis filtration system recycles and stores water. When in use, the Hub produces enough compost to sustain a small vegetable garden. Designed by John Dwyer, founder of Shelter Architecture, a Minneapolis-based design studio, the first prototype was built in June 2007 and delivered to New Orleans, where it is currently in use as part of an urban agriculture project."
                • Re: shipping container living

                  Fri, January 15, 2010 - 1:29 AM

                  More on "The Clean Hub", built from a recycled shipping container.
                  Article by Emily Pilloton for inhabitat dot com.
                  Link here, with more photos:

                  www.inhabitat.com/2007/07/1...clean-hub/


                  "The Clean Hub, “a new prototype for sustainable infrastructure” conceived by Shelter Architecture in collaboration with Architecture for Humanity, and designed and built by architecture students from the University of Minnesota, is a breath of fresh air in an often-luxury prefab world. One of the finalists in American Express’ Members Project ... the freestanding module delivers completely off-the-grid infrastructure, from clean water and sanitation to renewable power to disaster areas or rural locations without access to such resources.

                  The Clean Hub is an excellent architectural solution for post-emergency demographics and rural locations in need of off-the-grid power and water. The Clean Hub is also scalable to its specific human and natural ecosystem responding to population density, rainfall, sunlight and soil conditions.

                  John Dwyer, adjunct professor and partner with Shelter Architecture, said, “While our first prototype focuses on disaster response and refugee camps, we see the Clean Hub reaching all those who live without adequate supply of water, sanitation or power. Our hope is to design and deliver integrated, small scale infrastructure to millions in ways that range from entirely manufactured to entirely self built.”

                  “As with the Farmer’s Market in New Orleans, the home of the first prototype, we continue to see the Clean Hub as a catalyst for creating stable cultures. It’s scaled to serve 150 people at a time which coincides with the optimal number of people in a stable society. Also, when in use, the Clean Hub will produce compost allowing it to be coupled with small scale agriculture. This, in turn, creates a micro-economy”
                  • This is the maximum depth. Additional responses will not be threaded.

                    Re: shipping container living

                    Fri, January 15, 2010 - 1:35 AM


                    And one more on "The Clean Hub", from Minnesota Public Radio's site:

                    2007 article by Cathy Wurzer, here:

                    minnesota.publicradio.org/displ...anhub/




                    "Architecture that can change the world
                    by Cathy Wurzer, Minnesota Public Radio
                    April 29, 2007


                    "There are some very tired, and slightly nervous architecture and design students at the University of Minnesota. They have spent weeks getting their final project ready for a public presentation.

                    They've created a portable structure, called a "clean hub," that, when set up, can meet the power, water, sanitation, shelter and storage needs of people affected by natural disasters. The concept could also be used in refugee camps, which has drawn the interest of the World Bank.

                    Minneapolis, Minn. — The student-created structure that's being unveiled Monday is going to New Orleans, to become a demonstration project in an area of the city left barren by Hurricane Katrina.

                    "We know that someone will actually be using this, and it will actually go to some good," says Ryan Shortridge, one of the students working on the project. "So there has been a lot of heart in the design throughout the entire process. It's been a big push to get it done."

                    Sanitation container

                    Shortridge and his fellow architecture students hope their project will, someday, be used the world over.

                    Right now it looks like a rust-colored boxcar, with a platform that rolls out from one end. But, drawings and design animation tell a different story.

                    This is going to be a self-contained facility that, in cases of a natural disaster, doesn't need to be hooked up to a sewer system or electricity.

                    Dubbed a "clean hub," the former shipping container can be trucked into an affected area, and set up quickly. It will produce its own power and water supply, with an aim of providing basic sanitation for disaster victims worldwide.

                    "The rooftop has a rainwater collection on top of it, so then it goes inside where there is a filter and a rainwater storage tank," says Ryan Shortridge. "On the inside there is a bathroom that rolls out, with a composting toilet in it, and solar panels attach to the bathroom that will provide the power for the filtering system and the toilet. So, it is a self-contained water and sanitation center."

                    Fabricating parts

                    Shortridge has been working on the toilet facilities. Another student, Jeff Maas, is working on the rainwater collection system, which is a canvas awning that folds out and attaches to the roof of the container.

                    Maas says building the facility from scratch has been a challenge.

                    "The first week we started, we were all working pretty well. But, it turns out that one of the groups changed their design, which affected every other group. So we spent the second week redoing everything we did the first week," says Maas.

                    This prototype, built by senior U of M architecture students, will be set up in the devestated Lower 9th Ward of New Orleans.

                    "There are a couple of houses around that aren't sitting on their foundations. But it is a pretty much empty six- or seven-block area with no trees around," says Maas. "So the idea is to put this in and to get the community to start coming back -- have a community garden, a community space. And it will also function as a performing space."
                    "I always say I want to change the world with architecture, and this is definitely a way to do it."
                    - U of M architecture student Anna Christianson

                    The clean hub idea came from instructors John Dwyer and Tom Westbrook. Westbrook says shipping containers are cheap and readily available.

                    "Anywhere there's a disaster there are containers around, so there would be a few pieces of technology that would need to be put in," says Westbrook. "But these things could be built anywhere in the world and immediately deployed."

                    Instructor John Dwyer says the clean hub project was born after a semester of talking about slums and social issues, and how architecture can alleviate human suffering.

                    With New Orleans as a backdrop, the instructors and students hope this project is an example of how to quickly get clean water, sanitation and power to people who need it.

                    Dwyer says officials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency are interested in seeing the project.

                    "Hopefully it will succeed, in that it will create some political will," says Dwyer. "That is one of the big things we've been telling the students throughout the semester, is that you're not really designing a building. Either you're designing social equity or you're designing political will -- something to create a catalyst for another change."

                    Welding

                    Dwyer adds that he's not preaching a particular political philosophy.

                    "It's not my role to bend their political views, or their social or ethical views. So I sort of try and present them with the information, and let them design with it as they would," Dwyer says. "Within the action of the students, I would say there are a lot of positive affirmations that they are understanding the impact of this. And the most important thing is what role, as designers, they can play in it."

                    Student Anna Christianson says while other architecture students are drawing designs on paper for their final projects this semester, her classmates turned their design into a reality, and it left a lasting impression on her.

                    "I really gained a global understanding and awareness of how one-third of our world lives, without clean water and a place to use the restroom, which are really two core issues," says Christianson. "You can see anywhere around the world it is a problem, and in this country too. I always say I want to change the world with architecture, and so, this is definitely a way to do it."

                    The clean hub container will be shipped to New Orleans in June, to become the centerpiece of a community garden."
  • Re: shipping container living

    Thu, May 13, 2010 - 12:01 PM
    pachanoi wrote:



    shipping container 2nd story Today, 1:01 AM
    so, i am interested in the shipping container cabin, and will likely have to go with a
    20 footer because of location and placement since they dont require a tractor-trailer.

    i like the idea of a smaller footprint but this creates the need for some extra storage space.

    I would really like to put an a-frame short-top on it for a storage/sleepingloft...
    and making it look more like a traditional woodsy cabin seems like a good idea
    since im hoping to do this under the radar of building codes, which- as i understand it-
    is almost a given with most of this natural/green/diy/non-traditional stuff etc.

    so I have seen alot of container house sites, but never an example of this.

    so my question is....

    what would be the best way to approach the frame and truss attachment
    using the existing 4 steel anchor spots on the corners of the container...
    of course while keeping with the CHEAP and one-man DIY approach?

    your input is appreciated.
    thanks!
    • Re: shipping container living

      Thu, May 13, 2010 - 10:50 PM
      So you need it to span point to point to the anchor points? That would be twenty feet that would support walls, floor and roof of the second story. I tend to think in the standard construction way so the materials might be expensive.
      What if you made the walls a truss and use plywood to form a box beam, I think there would have to be webs too then you could hang a two by four joist floor and on top a two by four flat roof with a 1/4 inch per foot slope one way or the other. or 2x6 so you could get some insulation in the roof.
    • Unsu...
       

      Re: shipping container living

      Fri, May 14, 2010 - 12:20 AM

      it would definitely help for me to know appropriate terminology before I ask this question...haha
      my idea is basically to use common dimensional 2x4s (8-footers prob.) to make a-frame trusses
      (prob 10) to run lengthwise. I should call it an attic-loft and not another story i guess.

      I do have a welder, so adding anchors is going to be no problem i realized...
      so I guess my concern is -
      can i get away with anchoring each truss on each side (with bolts and L-brackets maybe)
      and laying my subfloor on that? ...using the bottom, horizontal truss "brace?" AS the floor joist.?

      also, im going to need to make the braces on each point of the truss triangle as small and strong as possible...
      would plywood braces on both sides of the truss be the way to go there?

      I can also do 3 poles in the center for support if needed too.

      i hope this makes sense.

      thanks for your input and tolerance ;) !!

      • Re: shipping container living

        Fri, May 14, 2010 - 9:43 PM
        The containers are 8 ft +-? Are you going to have enough room in an "A" frame? If the pitch is a 12&12 you will have 4ft in the center and the apex of the truss. I fit's 18&12 you will have 6ft at the apex. Draw it to full scale on the pavement so you have an idea of what the space is going to be like. Pitch= rise in inches per foot of run.
        l
        l
        rise > l
        --------- l
        run ^
        • Re: shipping container living

          Fri, May 14, 2010 - 9:44 PM
          forget my asci art..
          • Unsu...
             

            Re: shipping container living

            Fri, May 14, 2010 - 10:29 PM
            i did a rough, scaled-down drawing and got about 5feet which would be OK...
            I do not need to stand-up fully in it really-
            It would ONLY be a bed (futon matt.) on one-end and storage on the other...
            this would make the lower 160ish sq.ft. MUCH easier to live in.

            i was thinking even the back 8 feet for storage, middle 8 feet for bed and a
            miniature deck in the front 4ft for plants..

            i am at least aware that roof pitch is described in the numerical terms you gave,
            but cannot picture those in my mind...
            I would like to have a wee bit of overhang on the sides, but as long as I can get
            better than 4ft i think thats gonna work.

            thanks!
            • Re: shipping container living

              Sat, May 15, 2010 - 1:19 AM
              1.There is a guy who sells shipping container conversion plans on Ebay--- you might want to check into that. He has a decent paperback book on the topic; it goes into various types of add-ons, conversions, etc......I just can't recall whether it contains anything about A-frames. The same guy now offers his information on a cd-rom as well. Both are very reasonably priced ($15-$20), and the info can prevent a lot of re-inventing the wheel.

              2.This Costa Rican company offers an A-frame upper story built onto a shipping container. :)
              They also sell plans, blueprints, and at least one book on the topic.
              www.containerhomes.net/index.html

              3.Video from the same Costa Rica company.
              A ton of related videos are listed on the menu to the right. of the page.
              www.youtube.com/watch
              • Re: shipping container living

                Sat, May 15, 2010 - 9:08 AM
                I went to your video and I found this one which goes from the simple to mostly elaborate but very inspiring. And other videos that I will explore.
                I don't think you will have a problem finding a solution for your A frame add on.
                It seems there's more attachment points on the top or solutions to that after looking at the stacked containers with cantilevers.
                this is a great thread and I'm going to spend some more time checking it out.
                I see desert rat domiciles all over this thread!!! ;^) You could spend loads of money and save lots of money!!
                • Re: shipping container living

                  Sat, May 15, 2010 - 9:10 AM
                  I forgot my find!!
                  It could have been posted before so pardon me ir it was but I found this very inspiring!!
                  www.youtube.com/watch
                  • This is the maximum depth. Additional responses will not be threaded.
                    Unsu...
                     

                    Re: shipping container living

                    Sat, May 15, 2010 - 3:00 PM
                    thanks for the leads and links everyone!

                    it seems like a minimalist wish, I just need to watch alot
                    and probably get a book on framing.

                  • This is the maximum depth. Additional responses will not be threaded.

                    Re: shipping container living

                    Mon, May 17, 2010 - 4:32 PM
                    <<<It could have been posted before so pardon me ir it was but I found this very inspiring!!
                    www.youtube.com/watch


                    A lot of these shipping containers have been posted here before (in Photo section) and/or linked to here, but in my opinion, it's always more helpful to see a collection of them in one spot, whenever possible. Makes it much easier to compare and contrast, gives a great sense of "what's possible" etc.

                    Great link-- thanks for posting it! :)

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