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yogurt culture-where can I get live culture?

topic posted Wed, February 27, 2008 - 6:05 PM by  Julie
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Hi,
I would really like to find some yogurt culture that I can use over and over.
I usually just get the plain goat yogurt from the store that has good culture in it.
I think it would be wonderful to be able to make yogurt and use some of that to make more.
Anyone know where I can buy some?
Thanks,
Julie
posted by:
Julie
Seattle
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  • Re: yogurt culture-where can I get live culture?

    Wed, February 27, 2008 - 10:31 PM
    Julie,
    With yogurt it seems more like an issue of being able to make yogurt often enough to keep the cutlure thriving. And when I say often I am talking every other day at least. The cutlures used for yogurt are not as vibrant as cutlures used for kefir or other fermented milk products. If you made a quart of yogurt everyday or every other day, then I suspect you could keep it going. There are other cutlured milk products that you can keep going that make something similar to yogurt, but a different set of bacteria, so would taste different and have a different culture.
    Blessings
    Linda
  • Re: yogurt culture-where can I get live culture?

    Thu, February 28, 2008 - 12:08 AM
    If you're just making enough for you and your family, you don't need to do anything more than buy some of the unpasteurized yogurt at the store. I prefer the greek style myself because they tend to have a broader scope of probiotics than regular yogurt and it makes a tastier product. Which is what you'd probablynot get if you sent away for it. So this your culture, cheap, easy, alive and well.

    It's simple really. I would use one small container of greek yogurt, like a small cottage cheese container size, and mix it in with a gallon of 2% milk. Warm it to 110F, cover loosely, surround with a standard home heating pad set to maintain the temp for 10-12 hours, then throw a throw-blanket over it for insulation. It makes very tasty yogurt. That may sound bizarrely unsafe or unsanitary but it's definitely not if you take good care. If you're concerned then just get a yogurt maker. Though you may want a smaller quantity so experiment and adjust.

    And you can use some of each culture to start the next batch. Though every so often, just like with any home fermentation project, to avoid any possible ongoing harmful contamination I'd strongly recommend buying a fresh "culture."

    One fun thing to do is take about 3-4 cups of the yogurt and hang it in some butter muslin overnight to drain off the whey. It produces a spreadable version with the consistency somewhere between butter and cream cheese. It tastes amazing on toast, it's alive and you can control the fat content. Yummm!

    Enjoy,

    skooter
    • Re: yogurt culture-where can I get live culture?

      Thu, February 28, 2008 - 12:13 PM
      Hi,
      I think they have the greek yogurt at Trader Joe's.
      I will give that a try. I am also hearing Linda say that making it often helps to get enough bacteria in it to be beneficial.
      I do eat/drink alot of kefir...I have just sold most of my kefir culture so need to build it up again and wanted to make yogurt as
      well to keep the beneficial bacteria flowing....thanks for all your help, Julie
      • Re: yogurt culture-where can I get live culture?

        Fri, February 29, 2008 - 11:33 AM
        If you do sauerkraut or kim chee, there are acidophilus in there too (Though it's much slower to ferment than yogurt is) Rejuvelac is another one for making acidophilus in quantity, especially for those who are vegan or can't do much milk.
        • skooter, are you saying that there are "yogurts" that are pasteurized after having become yogurt?
          So it's pasteurized milk that's cultured, then pasteurized again?? Weird. That sounds about as useful as the sweet white coating on "yogurt covered" pretzels.

          I make a half gallon of raw yogurt once every week, and what little is left each time starts the next batch just fine- for a few months.

          Then a batch will come out weak, so the following week I'll use some storebought plain yogurt. Here in Vermont that means Stonyfield or Brown Cow. I buy a quart, use some, and pour the rest into ice cube tray(s). I put the yogurt cubes in a baggie, so I can grab a couple the next time I need some to rejuvenate my yogurt. One quart lasts quite a long time this way.
          • yes, they do that, it's gross. Luckily the mainstream public has caught on to the usefulness of probiotics so you see this less often now.


            Unluckily, that just means that there are more live yogurt products being sold as sugar bombs, like Activa and the like, complete with marketing about how they're good for you. Ugh. I really want this nasty period in health marketing to pass.
            • seriously. it made me sort of laugh to see the ads that are generated on my view of this here discussion:

              Yoplait Kids™
              The Nutritional Alternative That Still Tastes Great - Try One Now!

              Dannon Activia® is Unique
              Great-tasting lowfat yogurt Contains Bifidus Regularis


              etc....


              so crazy silly suddenly.
          • fixit fox wrote:...skooter, are you saying that there are "yogurts" that are pasteurized after having become yogurt?
            So it's pasteurized milk that's cultured, then pasteurized again?? Weird. That sounds about as useful as the sweet white coating on "yogurt covered" pretzels...
            >

            Yeah. Most commercial yogurt is made that way, and has been for decades. Bizarre, isn't it?

            To show how much of suckers we Americans truly are, now the industry is charging premium prices for yogurts with live cultures, unpasteurized, even though it's cheaper and easier for them to manufacture.
            • well, no, most commercial yogurt contains active cultures, as evidenced by the little note on the container to that effect, and the fact that I can ALWAYS make good yogurt with it if it says there's active culture in there. So don't worry TOO much about having to find the special stuff if you're not near a health food store or whatever.

              Mark
        • >>>Rejuvelac is another one for making acidophilus in quantity>>>

          Now there's a thought. As I understand it, if the lactic acid bacteria are thriving in rejuvelac, kimchi or whatever it should at least do one batch of yogurt.

          Had never thought of that.

          I make kefir every day from the kefir grains and make some awesome sour cream with fermented kefir. Lacto fermenting bacteria will eat almost anything dairy or non. After all kimchi, sourkraut etc can be started with the whey from a dairy culture---wo why not the other way around? Or is that "whey" around....hehe

          I will try making some sour cream with a starter left of my last batch of sweet potato soda as an experiment..

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